Felicia Rosenberg

Prof- Alvarez

English 363

27 June 2011

Narration: The Author’s Voice seeping Through the Text

Writers choose to write in many different styles.  The style of one’s book is the structure and everyone is compiled within that.  Narratology according to Jahn helps break down all the different kinds of narratives and writing styles that authors use.   The Lamentable Journey of Omaha Bigelow into the Impenetrable Loisaida Jungle by Edgardo Vega Yunque is a novel that starts off like any other novel.  It is telling a story about a man named Omaha.  However half way through the novel one can hear the narrator’s voice perservering throiugh the text.  Vega decides to give a lot of his own insight, mentioning other authors and narratology terms throughout the novel.  Gabriel Garcia Marquez is mentioned a couple of times throughout the novel in regards to magical realism.  Vega also put his opinion about a lot of things in the novel.  He gives his thoughts on other authors and what they have written.   In chapter twenty-three Vega makes references to J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter.  However he also goes into details about what an American novel does and is supposed to do.  “Along the same lines we’ve seen the burgeoning of the formula novel, ass seen in the output of the citied authors and others who basically write the same novel over and over again, as if they were manufacturing Pablum for toothless adults.  No cerebellum dentate there.  Formula authors create vapid, mildly entertaining novels, which likely contribute to the ever-increasing dumbing down of this big puppy of a country while contributing to the deterioration of its already inefficient educational system.  Of course there are still fine literary novels written by a few writers, and they’re published, but they’re not read widely.  Not because these novels are linguistically difficult, but because while they may entertain, they also challenge the reader to look at his soul.” (Vega, 175)  This statement has nothing to do with furthering the plot of the story.  It directly states Vega’s opinion on American literature and what novels do.  This is a way that Vega inserts his opinion into the novel.  His voice is able to come through the narration of the fictional story.  Vega does something a little out of the usual in chapter thirteen.  He decides to have one of the characters call him.  Up to this chapter one was reading a story about Omaha and his life.  However in this chapter Maruquita calls Mr. Vega because she is annoyed that she has to work with Omaha.  She thinks he is being difficult and doesn’t understand why Omaha isn’t going along with everything.  Omaha doesn’t understand that it is a book like Maruquita does.  In this chapter Vega is able to work himself into the story.  He is able to be the boss, author.  ” ‘Oh, right.  So it’s a book and you’re writing it and it doesn’t matter what I’ll be saying because everybody understands everybody else no matter what they’re speaking, right?’  ‘That’s right..  The important thing is the message that’s being conveyed.’  ‘And what is that?’  ‘Aha!  That’s for me to know and for you to find out, dude.'” (Vega, 98)  In this chapter Vega turns himself into one of the characters.  It’s bizarre that one of the characters is able to call the author within the story.  This is a great example of narration and how the writer is putting himself into the story as a character.  He always clearly explains what he is doing; write a book and lets the reader now in his mind a book is supposed to convey a message to the audience.  The hidden message cannot be revealed before the end of the book or why would the reader keep on reading?  A author has to be creative and clever in his narration such as Vega was in writing this novel.

Works Cited

Jahn, Manfred. “Narratology: A Guide to the Theory of Narrative.” 28 May 2005. Web. 24 June 2011.     <http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppn.htm>.

Vega Yunqué, Edgardo. The Lamentable Journey of Omaha Bigelow into the Impenetrable Loisaida Jungle.    Woodstock, New York: Overlook, 2004. Print. 

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2 Responses to “Response #3”

  1.   salvarez said:

    Your title: “Narration: The Author’s Voice seeping Through the Text”; very close, just a few little changes. You have to add the authors’ names and titles of their texts to your second half. I think we could also switch around what comes before and after what you have here. Something like “The Author’s Voice Seeping Through the Text: Narration in Edgardo Vega Yunqué’s The Lamentable Journey of Omaha Bigelow into the Impenetrable Loisaida Jungle”. That’s a long title, but that’s how they do them in the business. It’s not hard to do, it just takes some practice.

    After you get to this part: “This statement has nothing to do with furthering the plot of the story. It directly states Vega’s opinion on American literature and what novels do. This is a way that Vega inserts his opinion into the novel. His voice is able to come through the narration of the fictional story. Vega does something a little out of the usual in chapter thirteen. He decides to have one of the characters call him.” You should make the next sentence a new paragraph.

    I like what you wrote here, and I added some comments in CAPS:

    “In this chapter Vega turns himself into one of the characters. RIGHT HE MAKES HIMSELF PART OF HIS FICTION, OR HE CREATES A CHARACTER NAMED AFTER HIM, BASED ON HIMSELF It’s bizarre that one of the characters is able to call the author within the story. WHY? BECAUSE THAT DOESN’T HAPPEN OFTEN? This is a great example of narration and how the writer is putting himself into the story as a character. WHAT DOES THIS DO TO THE WAY HE TELLS THE STORY? DOES THAT MAKE THE STORY WORSE? He always clearly explains what he is doing; write a book and lets the reader now KNOW in his mind a book is supposed to convey a message to the audience. SO IS HE PUTTING THEM IN SUSPENSE? HE’S PUTTING THE MAIN STORY ON PAUSE RIGHT? THIS SOUNDS LIKE A LAYERED NARRATION The hidden message cannot be revealed before the end of the book or why would the reader keep on reading? A author has to be creative and clever in his narration such as Vega was in writing this novel.” BUT WHAT ABOUT WHEN HE STEPS IN TOO MUCH? DOES THAT AFFECT THE WAY WE READ THE STORY?

    Some great writing, keep up the great work. I don’t see a lot of Jahn terminology here, so make sure you add some of his key terms to your P and E sections. You also have to have a portion of your essay devoted to some PIE paragraphs about Jahn, to set up the parts where you apply the narratology to the novels.

    You might be interested to read the response 3 of your classmates Michael and Sabrina. They deal with some similar ideas as I see you developing here.

  2.   salvarez said:

    5 out of 5 points for the response.

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